Christmas Traditions | Poland

by CSweeney on June 18, 2014

in Christmas,christmas traditions

PolandMost, if not all, of the Christmas traditions in other cultures that we’ve explored over the last couple of weeks are grand celebrations of one kind or another. There are parties, there is singing and dancing, festivals and much merry making for all.  And, of course, in this way they are quite similar to the American way of celebrating Christmas. Lots of preparation and anticipation for both young and old, most definitely!

Today, however, we take a peek inside of a country that has a bit more of a somber note to it. In Poland, the Christmas holidays are a time to be very peaceful and to avoid the excess of anything. While feasts and parties and boisterous celebrations are going on in other parts of the world, Poland can often be found fasting, giving up their favorite food or beverage, and great effort is spent on remembering the real reason for the season.

Advent is a very busy time, tho! Lots of time is spent cleaning the house from top to bottom, washing windows and floors and carpets. It’s like spring cleaning! Everything must be clean for Christmas Day. This is common also where parties are held, but in Poland, there are no parties. It leaves one to wonder if perhaps the reason for the spic ‘n span home is to honor the Christ child himself.

Polish mealChristmas Eve day is a very important day. Traditionally it’s a day of abstaining from meat. If the Christmas tree hasn’t been put up yet, it is brought in and decked out with lights, tinsel and glass bulbs. And mistletoe! The Polish LOVE their mistletoe and love even more kissing beneath it! Overall, it’s a pretty quiet day…that is until night time.

Everyone is pretty hungry by now, and in order for their fasts to be broken, someone, anyone, must spot the first star in the night sky. You can bet the kids are out there, tummy’s growling! Once the first star has been spotted, a big meal is served and enjoyed by all. A place is often left open at the table, presumably for the Christ child.  The evening ends with attending a midnite mass.

At dawn on Christmas Day, it’s back to church for an early morning mass with special communion, a mass that honors Mary, the mother of Jesus.

Photo credit:  Flag, Table,

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