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Personalized Christmas Stockings

Everyone that celebrates Christmas needs a Christmas Stocking over the Fireplace

  • Christmas Stocking Stories: Newborns Get Festive Hospital Send Off

    Newborn babies are getting a special send off when it’s time to go home from St. Francis Medical Center, thanks to a tradition that spans more than five decades.

    Christmas Stocking Stories

    For more than two millennia, people around the globe have been celebrating Christmas—observing long-time religious and secular traditions, as well as adding their own unique practices. The Christmas stocking tradition, which took root in the early centuries A.D, is perhaps one of the most beloved traditions—and one that is certainly near and dear to our hearts here at Merry Stockings.

    In the spirit of honoring and making our own traditions, our “Christmas Stocking Stories” series aims to highlight Christmas stocking traditions that are touching, unique, and perhaps even a little bizarre. Enjoy.

    The Story of Newborn Stocking Stuffers

    December is a month of anticipation and preparation as we count the days until Christmas. But for the new mothers and fathers in the maternity ward at St. Francis Medical Center in Monroe, LA—Christmas comes early with the arrival of their new bundle of joy. And the hospital takes special care in making those newborns part of the holiday festivities.

    Since 1963—yes, you read that right—the newborn boys and girls have been sent home from the hospital in homemade, oversized Christmas stockings. The tradition is kept alive by volunteers within the St. Francis Auxiliary, according to KNOE.com, a local news station.

    Christmas Stockings for Newborns

    Photo Credit: Screenshot from KNOE.com video story.

    “I’ve had mothers tell me that their little brother got stockings and they wanted their babies to get stockings,” an unnamed volunteer told the news station. “So, we all love doing this.”

    KNOE.com reported that the purpose behind the tradition is to spread hope and love—which are core to the beliefs of the hospital.

    So, just how many Christmas stocking have been handmade and delivered since the tradition began?

    Last year, News Star reported that by the end of the 2017 season, it was estimated that more than 9,300 stockings had gone home with families. Oh, and each stocking takes a volunteer about an hour to make.

    You Can Spread Hope & Love with Christmas Stockings, Too

    You don’t have to be a skilled crafter or sewer to create special Christmas stockings for yourself, or your family or friends. With MerryStockings, you can pick a design and personalize, or take on a Bucilla stocking craft project to add your own spin. Below we share some of our favorite Christmas stockings that you can personalize.

    From left to right, Wool Christmas Stocking Green Reindeer, Christmas Stocking on the Farm Felt Stocking Kit, Wreath Red Felt Personalized Christmas Stocking,

    Does your family or organization have a special Christmas tradition? Share it with us in the comments section below.

  • 7 Creatively Delectable Christmas Stocking Cookie Recipes & Ideas

    Unsurprisingly, here at MerryStockings the Christmas stocking is our favorite holiday tradition. But Christmas cookies are a close second. In this piece, stockings and cookies come together to provide you with some holiday baking goals and inspiration.

    7 Creative, Must-Try Christmas Stocking Cookie Recipes

    Here at MerryStockings, it’s likely no surprise that our favorite Christmas tradition is none other than the Christmas stocking. For us, Christmas stockings represent childhood joy, excitement, and anticipation of reward for so many weeks of good behavior.

    But while we’ve been busy being nice all year, when the holiday season arrives, it’s OK to be a little naughty. Of course, we’re talking about indulging in some tasty, tantalizing treats: Christmas cookies.

    And in the spirit of adding a little sugar, spice, and everything (naughty and) nice to our Christmas stocking passion, below we bring you several creative and delicious Christmas stocking cookie recipes and ideas—plus a twist on a classic no-bake treat. Because what’s the key to a balanced diet at Christmastime? A delicious Christmas cookie in each hand. 🍪🎅🎄

    Enjoy!

    1. Stocking Placeholder Cookies

    Christmas Stocking Cookie PlaceholdersAre you hosting Christmas dinner? Then this incredibly clever Christmas cookie recipe is just for you.

    Thanks to The Bearfoot Baker’s Stocking Place Card Cookies idea, you can provide your guests with a delicious treat, easily direct them where to sit, and add to the Christmas ambiance of your home.

    The recipe is pretty simple. Simply use your favorite sugar cookie recipe for the dough, and purchase a stocking cookie cutter to shape the cookie. From there, decorate as you see fit, using a food-safe pen to personalize.

    To make the hook, Lisa—The Bearfoot Baker—points you to another cookie crafting blog, SemiSweet. (Spoiler: This place card cookie idea can extend beyond the holiday season.)

    Photo Credit: The Bearfoot Baker

    2. Lump of Coal Cookies

    Christmas Lump of Coal CookiesThese Lump of Coal Cookies recipe idea from Evermine’s Party Inspiration blog is perfect for those who want an easy way to create a fun, sweet Christmas gift.

    We love this recipe for its ties to the Christmas stocking tradition.

    But we also want to devour this recipe because of the ingredients: Oreos, marshmallows, and butter.

    Yum!

    Photo Credit: Evermine

    3. Gingerbread Christmas Stocking Cookies

    Gingerbread Stocking CookiesAs St. Paul, MN-based Land O’Lakes puts it, this “mild-flavored” Gingerbread Christmas Stocking Cookies recipe will please people of all ages and is a “perfect choice for a family holiday afternoon of cookie decorating.”

    Land O’Lakes provides a recipe for both the gingerbread cookies and the homemade frosting to top them.

    What makes this recipe different from others we’ve seen is that it calls for freshly grated orange or lemon zest.

    Now, how delicious does that sound?

    Photo Credit: Land O’Lakes

    4. Elfish Christmas Stocking Cookies

    Elfish Christmas Stocking CookiesIf you’re looking for an ambitious cookie decorating project, look no further than this ultra-fancy Christmas stocking cookie idea from the LilaLoa blog.

    While the author originally made her own “cookie cutter” to craft these beauties, it’s now available through WhiskedAwayCutters on Etsy. Now, it’s just the frosting that requires attention and effort.

    But this post walks you through it, including the details on how to craft the signature pink color.

    Photo Credit: LilaLoa

    5. Rice Krispie Treat Stockings

    Rice Krispie Treat Christmas StockingsWhether you’re looking to include your young children in the holiday baking festivities or you can’t resist Rice Krispie Treats, this recipe idea is for you.

    The blog Kid Friendly Things to Do shows you how to create easy Rice Krispie Treats Stockings, walking you through the process step-by-step.

    The “Treats” recipe ice the same save for the addition of green dye gel.

    But one special tip to note from the blog’s author, Melissa:

    “The marshmallow and the fruit roll up tends to harden at a remarkable pace,” she says. “Be sure to cover these fun treats in an airtight container for storage. You can probably get away with making these up to a few days in advance.”

    6. Meringue Christmas Stocking Cookies

    Meringue Christmas Stocking CookiesThese Meringue Christmas Stocking Cookies from Carol at Always the Holidays blog are one of the most unique Christmas cookie ideas that we’ve come across.

    According to the author, this recipe is a sure-fire hit.

    “The meringue cookies are brimming with the flavors of cream cheese and cranberries and are so pretty and festive,” she says.

    The entire list of ingredients, and step-by-step instructions are laid out in an easy-to-follow format here.

    Photo Credit: Always the Holidays

    7. Holiday Stocking Surprise Cookies

    Christmas Stocking Surprise CookiesRemember earlier when we mentioned that it was OK to be a little naughty at Christmastime? Well, with these Holiday Stocking Surprise Cookies from Life With 4 Boys, you can feel a little bit better about your indulgences.

    In this recipe, the blog’s author swapped traditional sugar for Splenda.

    “The result?” the author asks rhetorically. “The same delicious cookies I love with a little less guilt.”

    The best part? The stockings are stuffed with a variety of traditional cookie additions including chocolate chips, walnuts, and bits of cherries.

    Also, after the prep is done, the baking time is just 10 minutes per sheet.

    Photo Credit: Life With 4 Boys

    Ready. Set. Bake.

    Next to Christmas stockings, Christmas cookies are our favorite holiday tradition. We hope this compilation of tasty ideas provides you with some holiday baking goals and inspiration. Happy Baking!

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  • Why We Kiss Under the Mistletoe & How it Became a Christmas Tradition

    When did mistletoe become a Christmas tradition? And why do we kiss under the mistletoe at Christmas? Like many traditions, the origin story of mistletoe at Christmas has many influences.

    How Mistletoe Became a Christmas Tradition

    In the wild, mistletoe grows as a parasite, feeding off its host tree. But within Christmas tradition and pagan folklore, it’s a symbol of love and romance—and of course, kissing.

    So, how did a parasitic plant become associated with love and affection at Christmastime?

    Like most traditions, the origin story of mistletoe at Christmas has many influences.

    What’s In a Name? What ‘Mistletoe’ Means

    As we alluded to in the opening, mistletoe is actually a parasitic plant. According to the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), there are 1,300 species of mistletoe in the world—20 of which are actually endangered worldwide.

    “When a mistletoe seed lands on a suitable host, it sends out roots that penetrate the tree and draw on its nutrients and water,” NWF explains. “Mistletoes also can produce energy through photosynthesis in their green leaves.”

    Now for the funny part: Mistletoe gets its name from the Anglo-Saxon words “mistle” and “tan,” which mean “dung” and “twig,” respectively. The modern translation? “Poop on a stick.” Apparently, Anglo-Saxons noticed that mistletoe grew where birds left their droppings.

    Mistletoe: A Centuries-Old Symbol of Health & Love

    Mistletoe has been a symbolic herb for centuries. In fact, according to History.com, several cultures “prized” mistletoe for its alleged healing properties.

    “The Greeks were known to use it as a cure for everything from menstrual cramps to spleen disorders, and the Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder noted it could be used as a balm against epilepsy, ulcers and poisons,” History.com explains.

    When it comes to mistletoe’s romantic associations, the Celtic Druids and the Norse are credited with that.

    For the Druids, mistletoe’s ability to bloom during winter made it a symbol of vivacity, History.com says. As a result, they often used the plant on animals and humans in hopes of boosting or restoring fertility.

    As for the Norse, mistletoe plays an important role in ancient mythology, which helps explain why mistletoe is associated with kissing.

    “As the story goes, when the god Odin’s son Baldur was prophesied to die, his mother Frigg, the goddess of love, went to all the animals and plants of the natural world to secure an oath that they would not harm him,” History.com details. “But Frigg neglected to consult with the unassuming mistletoe, so the scheming god Loki made an arrow from the plant and saw that it was used to kill the otherwise invincible Baldur.”

    Another version claims the gods were able to bring Baldur back from the dead with mistletoe. Elated by the return of her son, Frigg “declared mistletoe a symbol of love and vowed to plant a kiss on all those who passed beneath it.”

    How Mistletoe Became a Christmas Tradition

    How mistletoe made the leap from symbol of love and vitality to “Kiss-mas” tradition isn’t completely clear.

    As History.com tells us, by the 18th century kissing under the mistletoe had become widely embedded in Christmas tradition, and appears to have started among servants in England and spread to other classes from there.

    To refuse a kiss was bad luck, as long as berries were still left on the mistletoe. As biologist Rob Dunn describes an article in Smithsonian Magazine:

    “As Washington Irving wrote in the 1800s, ‘young men have the privilege of kissing the girls under [mistletoe], plucking each time a berry from the bush. When the berries are all plucked the privilege ceases.’”

    Pucker Up for Tradition

    While the meaning behind the mistletoe name is less than savory, it’s history in ancient folklore and Christmas tradition is rooted in luck, love, and romance. So, pucker up in the name of tradition this Christmas.

    Ready for another history lesson? Learn about the history of Christmas stockings.

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  • How Did Red & Green Become Traditional Christmas Colors?

    Have red and green always been part of Christmas tradition? The answer may surprise you.

    Why Red & Green Are Christmas Colors

    From poinsettias to Christmas stockings hung by the fire with care, the Christmas season is dripping with vibrant reds and greens as far as the eye can see. But how did red and green become the signature color combination of Christmas?

    Like many Christmas traditions, the history of why greens and reds are associated with the season is storied and debated. In this piece, we highlight the origin stories—one of which will undoubtedly surprise you.

    “Holly Jolly” Inspiration from Ancient Pagans

    While the Christmas holiday itself is rooted in religion, there are several pagan infusions that have shaped how we celebrate. And as some report, the greens and reds are one of those hybrid traditions—thanks to holly plants.

    As Reader’s Digest reports: “Ancient Celtic peoples revered red- and green-colored holly plants for being evergreen and believed holly was meant to keep Earth beautiful during the dead of winter. So when they and other cultures celebrated the winter solstice, they decorated their homes with holly to bring protection and good luck to their families in the coming year.”

    It’s also been reported that ancient Romans used holly as part of their winter solstice celebrations, too.

    The Crown of Thorns

    Holly actually plays a double role in the history of this tradition. Holly is closely associated with the crown of thorns placed on Jesus’ head before he died on the cross. As a fun fact, holly is known as “christdorn” in German, which means “Christ thorn.”

    Legend says the berries were originally white, but the blood Jesus shed for our sins forever stained the berries red.

    The Paradise Play

    This explanation is one of the more colorful (pun intended) theories.

    But as David Landry, who religious studies at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN, told a local news station, he believes red and green likely became part of tradition thanks to a 14th century play depicting the world’s first man and woman.

    “One of these plays was the Paradise play—the fall of Adam and Eve,” he told the station. “The traditional date for that was Dec. 24.”

    More specifically, the storied apple prop was red, and of course, the tree was green.

    Coca-Cola’s Iconic Santa Claus

    Arielle Eckstut, co-author of Secret Language of Color, has spoken to many publications about the Christmas colors origin stories. She attributes the rise of the colors to two things. The first is holly.

    "Holly has played a huge part in this red and green association," she told NPR with confidence.

    As for her second theory, that one’s more interesting, dating back to a Coca-Cola hiring decision in 1931.

    “Coca-Cola hired an artist to create a Santa Claus," Arielle said in an interview with NPR. "They had done this before, but this particular artist created a Santa Claus that we associate with the Santa Claus today in many ways: He was fat and jolly—whereas before he was often thin and elf-like—and he had red robes.”

    “It solidified in our collective imaginations the red of Santa's robes with the green of fir trees and holly and [poinsettia] that we already had in our minds,” she added.

    According to NPR, that artist was Haddon Sundblom. Since his art was such a bit hit, Coca-Cola continued working with him for decades.

    Photo Credit: Coca-Cola via Miel Van Opstal/Flickr

    Colorful Threads of the Same Fabric—That’s Tradition

    Every tradition we hold dear has a variety of influences and evolves over time—and the signature colors of Christmas are no exception.

    While there’s no one agreed upon point of origin, it’s safe to say that every theory has shaped the overall story of the colors of Christmas. And at the end of the day, it’s simply tradition.

    What long-time or unique Christmas traditions does your family honor each year? Tell us in the comments section below.  

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  • How Did Candy Canes Become a Traditional Christmas Symbol?

    Full disclosure: Nobody really knows the “exact” origin of the candy cane. But several tales and confirmed historical facts help paint a minty picture.

    History of Candy Canes as a Christmas Tradition

    Candy canes are one of the most beloved sweet treats at Christmastime. And, of course, candy canes are also go-to Christmas stocking stuffers and Christmas tree decorations.

    But how exactly did candy canes become a Christmas tradition? Who invented candy canes? What do candy canes symbolize? Are candy canes have a religious history?

    As it turns out, the history of candy canes and their symbolism is a bit murky, to say the least.

    Separating Candy Cane Fact From Folklore

    Many Christmas traditions have storied histories. For example, when it comes to the origins of Christmas stockings, the most popular story is rooted in St. Nicholas leaving gold in the socks of a widower’s three daughters.

    When it comes to candy canes, there are also many tales, but little documented evidence. Smithonsian.com says, “There are a lot of explanations floating around out there about the candy cane—but almost none of them are true.” And as Time Magazine puts it, “The history of the candy cane is mired in folklore.”

    Of course, with Christmas being a celebration rooted in Christian tradition to honor the first coming of Jesus Christ, many of the stories have religious roots.

    What are those stories? Let’s explore the three most common.

    The German Choirmaster

    As the story goes, “church history” states that back 1670 the choirmaster Germany’s Cologne Cathedral was facing an all-to common problem: keeping children still, quiet, and engaged during long Christmas services.

    In search of a solution, he visited a local candymaker, and as legend tells it, the choirmaster paused when he saw white “sugar sticks.” Thinking these sugar sticks could do just the trick, but worrying giving children sugar during worship may be frowned upon, he allegedly asked the candymaker if he could bend the top to make the sticks look more like a shepherd's cane.

    This way, the children could remember the shepherd’s that visited the infant Jesus—and the white color could be used to teach children about living a sinless life.

    However, according to Snopes, no one has been able to produce documentation that either confirms the account or reliably dates it to the 17th century. Moreover, the first written references of candy canes at Christmas didn’t pop up until 1874, which is 200 years after it was reportedly invented and popularized, the fact checking organization says.

    The Indiana Candymaker

    The Indiana-based candymaker story competes most directly with the German choirmaster account. In this origin story, which reportedly takes on the same timeline as the choirmaster tale, it’s said that the Indiana confectioner wanted to make a candy that could be a “witness,” incorporating multiple symbols from the birth, ministry, and death of Jesus.

    Legend says the shape of the cane—a “J”— pays homage to His name, as well as the shepherd’s stick. The white would represent purity and the sinless nature of Jesus. Finally, thinking the candy was far too plain, the candymaker stained it red to symbolize the blood Jesus shed on the cross.

    Once again, this story has a few problematic historical references, according to Snopes, with the biggest error in the locale of the supposed invention. Indiana didn’t exist in the 17th century, and it’s hard to fathom that history would neglect to record this inventor’s name.

    The Immigrant

    This story speaks more to why candy canes may have become part of Christmas tradition, but not too much detail as to who created them or exactly when.

    In this story, candy canes became part of Christmas tradition in the United States in 1847 when German immigrant August Imgard, who’s said to be the one who introduced Christmas trees in Ohio, decorated his tree with candy canes.

    While most don’t dispute his claim to Christmas tree fame, there’s contradicting evidence on whether candy canes were used as ornaments.

    The Undisputed Piece of Candy Cane History

    While we may not know when, how, or who invented candy canes, what we do know is that the Keller Machine, invented in the mid-1950s, changed candy cane production for the better.

    Candymaker Bob McCormack was reportedly having trouble consistently creating hooked candy canes; many were ending up in the trash. That’s until Father Gregory Keller, a Catholic priest and the brother-in-law of the candymaker, invented a machine that automated the process.

    Soon after, the machine was reportedly perfected by two of McCormack’s employees, helping the candies come out perfect nearly every time.

    As they say, the rest is history. Regardless of how candy canes came to be part of the Christmas celebration, they’re here and here to stay. So, when it comes time to decorate the tree or stuff your Christmas stockings, add candy canes with cheer.

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  • ‘Over-Stocking’ Sale: How to Get a Deal on Christmas Stockings

    How to Get a Deal on Christmas Stockings

    At MerryStockings.com, every day is Christmas. We’re not ashamed to say that we eat, live, and breathe Christmas and all its wonder. As a result, for more than a decade we’ve been a year-round provider of quality, beautiful, personalized Christmas stockings that can ship quickly and become a treasured heirloom.

    But let’s be honest. We love a good deal—and we’re sure you do, too. All of our Christmas stockings are affordably priced, but here’s a little secret: There’s always opportunities to get an even better deal.

    So, whether you need a last-minute stocking, you’re looking for a special birthday gift, or you’re celebrating Christmas in July, below we share a couple secrets on how to find Christmas stockings on sale and get the best deal on our stockings.

    Peruse Our “Overstock Sale” Section

    From knit classics to traditional velvet, we strive to offer a robust collection of Christmas stockings fit for every taste. And we’re getting new items in all the time—and that means we always have special overstock deals year-round.

    So, anytime you’re looking for a deal on Christmas stockings, check out the Overstock Sale section of our website, which can be found as an option under “Stockings” in the toolbar.

    Check Out Our “Discount Codes” Page

    In addition to our Overstock Sale section, we often have other discounts and promotional savings to take advantage of throughout the year. From free shipping to percentage discounts, the MerryStockings Discount Codes page is always updated with the latest promo codes you can take advantage of.

    Here’s an example of the special discount on Christmas stockings our customers found in July.

    Merry Stockings Coupon Codes

    Sign Up for Our Newsletter

    From new arrivals to new clearance items to special promotions, our newsletter will deliver the latest deals and Christmas inspiration right to your inbox. This makes it easy to keep up on our inventory and special offers. And don’t worry. We won’t spam you. Typically, we send just one email each month.

    How can you sign up? It’s easy. Go to our homepage and scroll down until you see “Sign Up For The Latest MerryStockings News” callout. From there, all you need to do is enter your email.

    After you enter your email, you’ll see this note to let you know it was a success.

    Find the Perfect Christmas Stocking at the Perfect Price

    Christmas is often called the season of giving, something we take to heart. So, to get quality Christmas stockings on sale, keep checking back in with us so we can give you the best deal possible.

  • The Theories Behind the Tradition of Oranges as Stocking Stuffers

    Why We Put Oranges in Christmas Stockings

    For centuries, Christmas stockings have been a centerpiece of religious and secular tradition, bringing little treasures and joy to children (and adults) on Christmas Day. And just as the history of the Christmas stocking itself has many facets, so too do the traditional treasures that are left inside.

    One such treasure is: The Christmas Orange.

    As it turns out, there’s no one theory as to why the citrus fruit became a traditional stocking stuffer. But each of the reasonings has merit. Let’s explore some of those theories.

    St. Nick’s Special Gift to a Widower

    Before coming into sainthood, St. Nicholas—who’s legend evolved into today’s Santa Claus tradition—was a generous, wealthy bishop. Allegedly one day, he heard of widowed shopkeeper and father to three beautiful daughters. The father was deeply concerned that his daughters would never marry as he couldn’t afford a dowry—and if he were to die, the girls would be left alone and destitute.

    As the story is often told, St. Nick was touched by the father’s dire situation and wanted to help. So, he crept into the man’s home one night and put bags of gold—or perhaps balls of gold as some tales say—in each of the girls’ stockings.

    When the father and his girls woke the next morning, they found the gold and rejoiced. The girls could now get married and the father’s worries were put to rest.

    As Smithsonian.com points out, the tradition of putting gold in stockings isn’t very easy to replicate. As a result, oranges (and sometimes tangerines) started being used as a representation of gold.

    What’s more, some say the oranges aren’t meant to simply represent the gold St. Nick left behind—but also his incredible generosity.

    Today, Christmas is known as the season of giving. So, by stuffing stockings with oranges, we’re paying homage to both the gift itself and the intention behind it.

    A Luxurious Treat on Christmas Day

    This “luxurious treat” theory has roots in multiple different points of history. Firstly, some say the tradition originated well before the 19th Century.

    As you can imagine, the trade routes, transportation types, and technology were far less developed than what we have today. As a result, oranges were not easily accessible in non-native growing areas—meaning only the wealthy could typically afford such an exotic treat. So, you could imagine the jubilation of a poor or average person receiving such an incredible treasure in their stocking on Christmas morning.

    Others claim the orange tradition was founded during the Great Depression and/or World War eras in the first half of the 20th Century.

    For a little more background, according to Taste of Home, the Sunkist brand burst on the scene in 1908. In fact, oranges were the first produce item to have its own ad campaign, the publication said. As a result, the interest and demand for oranges exploded across the country—and eventually accessibility began to grow.

    But during the Great Depression, as well as World War I and World War II, many felt the major financial crunch. So, depending on location and circumstance, using oranges as stocking stuffers could have been an easy, yet special, treat or an outstanding luxury.

    Oranges Are Lucky

    Perhaps one of the more unique theories behind the orange stocking stuffer tradition is rooted in ancient Chinese and other Asian customs and beliefs.

    You see, the orange has been a symbol of good fortune and luck for centuries. During the Chinese New Year celebration, which takes place very close to Christmas festivities every year, oranges (and tangerines) are often used as decorations and are exchanged among friends and family.

    While there isn’t a definitive connection between the Asian belief and the Christmas tradition, it’s reasonable to assume it’s no coincidence. As our world has become more interconnected, and both religious and secular traditions have mingled over the years, the orange stocking stuffer tradition has been influenced from multiple angles.

    What it All Comes Down To? Tradition

    Despite the many competing and complementing theories, the common thread is simple: tradition.

    No matter the historical reasoning one chooses to embrace, the fact is that putting oranges in stockings represents the spirit of the season; giving generosity, giving joy, giving luck, and passing on tradition.

    What long-time or unique Christmas traditions does your family honor each year? Tell us in the comments section below.  

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  • Christmas Stocking Stories: The 'Wall' Over 50 Years in the Making

    Christmas Stocking Stories

    For more than two millennia, people around the globe have been celebrating Christmas—observing long-time religious and secular traditions, as well as adding their own unique practices. The Christmas stocking tradition, which took root in the early centuries A.D, is perhaps one of the most beloved traditions—and one that is certainly near and dear to our hearts here at Merry Stockings.

    In the spirit of honoring and making our own traditions, our “Christmas Stocking Stories” series aims to highlight Christmas stocking traditions that are touching, unique, and perhaps even a little bizarre. Enjoy.

    The Story of Lorraine Kelly’s Christmas Stocking “Wall”

    More than 50 years ago, Arlington Heights, IL resident Lorraine Kelly was expecting her 11th child. But after developing a blood clot early in her pregnancy, she was reportedly prescribed complete bed rest—which would ultimately last more than two months.

    But according to the Daily Herald, the newspaper covering Chicago and its suburbs where Lorraine lives, those months of bed rest would be the start of an incredible Christmas tradition.

    At the suggestion of a friend, Lorraine began making Christmas stockings to pass the time as she waited for her new baby to arrive. She designed the pattern and eventually personalized them with the names of each of her 11 children. But according to the article, she didn’t stop at stocking No. 11.

    As her children married—and as grandchildren and great grandchildren came—she kept going. It was almost a rite of passage and a way to make a person’s entry into the family official. And as Lorraine told the newspaper: “You had to be married to get on the wall. You couldn’t be a boyfriend.”

    Soon the total swelled to 73 stockings. But once the grandchildren started marrying—Lorraine hung up her needle and thread—it had gotten to be too much, she told the paper.

    But perhaps the most endearing part is “The Wall”—a Christmas stocking shrine inside Lorraine’s home that displays each of her lovingly handcrafted masterpieces.

    (Photo Credit: Joe Lewnard, Staff Photographer at the Daily Herald)

    According to the Daily Herald, The Wall serves as a centerpiece to the family’s annual Dec. 23 Christmas celebration at Lorraine’s home.

    And guess what? All of her 11 children have reportedly created their own stocking wall inside their homes. And, as is tradition, each of the stockings has been made from the same pattern and same felt material to make them match Lorraine’s originals.

    Thank you to the Daily Herald for brining this incredible story to light last year. You can read the full article here.

    Create Your Own Personalized Christmas Stockings

    You don’t have to be a skilled crafter or sewer to create your own special stocking. Bucilla Felt Christmas Stocking Kits give you everything you need. Below are some of our favorites:

    Bucilla Christmas Stockings

    From left to right: Deer Family Bucilla Christmas Stocking Kit, Golfing Santa Bucilla Christmas Stocking KitCandy Snowman Bucilla Christmas Stocking Kit 

    Does your family have a special Christmas tradition? Share it with us in the comments section below.

  • 6 Classic & Beautiful Christmas Stockings for Moms

    Christmas Stocking Ideas for Mom

    Christmas stockings often have deep personal meaning. As kids, our Christmas stockings represented the coming of Santa Claus, and the excitement and treasures Christmas morning would bring. As adults, Christmas stockings bring childhood nostalgia and allow us to carry on a longtime tradition within our own families.

    As a result, choosing the perfect Christmas stocking for each member of your family is important. When it comes to selecting the perfect “Mom” Christmas stocking, you want to find one that represents your personality, interests and hobbies, as well as stands the test of time.

    To lend a helping hand, we’ve compiled some of our favorite Christmas stocking ideas from our inventory. Click on any of the photos to learn more about the stocking.

    1. Mrs. Claus Personalized Christmas Stocking

    Mrs. Claus on Christmas StockingThis charming Mrs. Claus Christmas stocking is just one of our most popular styles from our Christmas character stockings collection, which isn’t a surprise. After all, Mrs. Claus is an iconic and celebrated Christmas characters.

    This stocking is elegantly crafted from tan corduroy, red velvet, and dainty pom poms, and features a hand-sewn Mrs. Claus character at its center.

    Like all of our christmas stockings, personalization is included. For this particular stocking, you can choose between block, italic, or script fonts.

    2. Red Velvet Christmas Stocking with White Velvet Cuff

    Classic Red & White Velvet Christmas StockingThis red and white velvet Christmas stocking is just like every mother — a classic beauty.

    This always-festive stocking will never go out of style and can fit with any decorating style.

    The best part? It’s incredibly well-made, affordable, and can be personalized with your choice of three fonts in red or green thread.

    3. Ivory Quilted Cotton Personalized Christmas Stocking

    Quilted Ivory Christmas StockingIf you want to highlight Mom’s striking personality with her elegant home decor stylings, this ivory quilted Christmas stocking is a sublime choice.

    This classically styled stocking works with any color scheme and holiday decor theme, adding elegance, softness, and sweetness to your home — just like Mom.

    4. The Carolers Personalized Needlepoint Stocking

    Needlepoint Christmas Stocking with CarolersWhether or not Mom is a gifted singer, listening or singing Christmas carols are likely a favorite tradition — and this needlepoint Christmas stocking featuring carolers helps capture that.

    This stocking is part of our “Christmas Scenes” collection and features a family of four singing under a starry sky.

    When it comes to personalizing this stocking, you can choose from three stylish fonts: script, italic, or block.

    5. Classic Red Snowflakes Stocking

    Classic Red Snowflake Stocking for MomIf the Mom in your life has simple, classic tastes, the stocking featuring a rounded snowflake design could be a great choice. This stocking features beautifully embroidered red snowflakes floating against a white background.

    Beautiful, festive, and full of holiday spirit, there’s no doubt that this personalized stocking will also add a bit of elegance to your mantel this year.

    6. Christmas Tree Knit Stocking

    Knit Christmas Stocking for MomThe Christmas Tree Knit Personalized Stocking pays homage to classic, old-school Christmas stockings of the past. It’s as soft and sweet as a mother’s touch, as well as generous in size to make it easy to stuff the stocking to the brim.

    Complete with cute details in red and green, this wool stocking embellished with Christmas trees and a heart, comes with or without personalization.

    Find the Perfect ‘Mom’ Christmas Stocking

    From classic characters to simple and modern designs, MerryStockings offers a wide ranging selection of personalized Christmas stockings that are perfect every family member. We invite you to shop all of our Christmas stockings.

  • 5 Awesome Christmas Stockings for Dads

    5 Awesome Christmas Stockings for Dads

    Christmas stockings often have deep personal meaning. As kids, our Christmas stockings represented the coming of Santa Claus, and the excitement and treasures Christmas morning would bring. As adults, Christmas stockings bring childhood nostalgia and allow us to carry on a longtime tradition within our own families.

    As a result, choosing the perfect Christmas stocking for each member of your family is important. When it comes to choosing a Christmas stocking to represent Dad, you want to find one that represents his personality, interests and hobbies, as well as a stocking that also stands the test of time.

    To help you out, we’ve compiled some of our favorite Dad stocking ideas from our inventory. Click on any of the photos to learn more about the stocking.

    1. Santa Claus Personalized Stocking

    Santa Claus Character StockingSanta Claus is one of the most iconic, celebrated, and beloved Christmas characters. His importance during the Christmas season mirrors that of Dad’s importance year-round, making the Santa Claus character stocking a perfect fit.

    The Santa Claus character stocking is made of tan corduroy and features a hand-sewn Santa Claus. The top and toe of the stocking are accented with soft red velvet.

    Like all of our christmas stockings, personalization is included. For this particular stocking, you can choose between block, italic, or script fonts.

    2. Snowflake Knit Personalized Stocking

    Knit Snowflake Stocking for DadThe Snowflake Knit Personalized Stocking pays homage to classic, old-school Christmas stockings of the past.

    It’s soft to the touch and generous in size to make it easy for you to stuff Dad’s stocking to the brim.

    Complete with cute details in red and green, this wool stocking can be personalized with “Dad” or his name for free.

    3. Decorating the Tree Personalized Needlepoint Stocking

    Needlepoint Christmas Stocking for DadNext to opening Christmas stockings on Christmas Day, decorating the Christmas tree is a favorite tradition for many families. If Dad is often the person who finishes off the decorating extravaganza by topping the tree, this needlepoint stocking featuring a tree decorating scene could be just the ticket.

    This stocking is part of our “Christmas Scenes” collection and features three characters adding lights, ornaments, and the tree topper to the tree. When it comes to personalizing this stocking, you can choose from three stylish fonts: script, italic, or block.

    4. Classic Red Snowflakes Stocking

    Christmas Stocking with Red SnowflakesIf Dad has simple and classic tastes, the Classic Red Snowflakes Stocking could be a great choice.

    This stocking features beautifully embroidered red snowflakes, which seem to float down the stocking, against a white background.

    Beautiful, festive, and full of holiday spirit, this personalized stocking will also add a bit of elegance to your mantel this year.

    5. Wool Christmas Stocking with Reindeers

    Personalized Christmas Stocking with ReindeerIf you’re looking for something timeless, look no further than this wool Christmas stocking with reindeer, featuring a red cuff and food, and rows of trees, snowflakes, and reindeer.

    This Christmas stocking is 100-percent made in the USA. It’s made of wool from Nebraska, knit in Iowa, and finished with hand-embroidered personalization details in Minnesota. It’s also exclusive to MerryStockings.

    The stocking is well-made and lined to help it last for decades to come.

    Find the Perfect Christmas Stocking for Dad

    From classic characters to simple and modern, MerryStockings offers a wide ranging selection of personalized Christmas stockings that are perfect for any dad in your life. We invite you to shop all of our Christmas stockings.

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