christmas traditions

  • Beautiful Christmas Wreaths

    wreath topFor the last couple of days I've been talking with you about Christmas wreaths....their history and just exactly how you put one of 'em together so it looks great. I was thinking last night about my first wreath and how I really had no idea on how it was supposed to look or what theme I wanted.

    If this is your first time making your own Christmas wreath, I thought maybe offering some ideas of what others have done might help to get the ol' creative ball rolling. So without further ado, settle in for some viewing pleasure. :)\

    wreath 1

     

     

    wreath 2

     

     

    wreath 8

     

    wreath 3

     

     

    wreath 5

     

    wreath 4 rosemary

     

    wreath 6

     

    wreath 7

     

    wreath 9

     

    wreath 10

     

    See, I told you you couldn't do it wrong. :)

    Next time we'll take a look at some creative wreaths that are made out of materials other than greens. It's going to be very fun, so don't miss it!

    Until then,

    Cheryl

    Photo Credit: Title Wreath, Gallery

  • Christmas Stories | The Missing Five Pound Note

    bedtime storiesReading bedtime stories is a favorite, universal tradition. And, if your kids are anything like mine, they definitely have their favorites. I could read one of those favored stories every night for a month, and they'd never grow tired of it! There is something about hearing a familiar story that calms their little hearts and gives them permission to drop off to sleep.

    Apparently there are a few rather well known Christmas stories that have circulated, and have become very helpful in helping the kids settle down, especially on the nights leading up to Christmas! Their little bodies just have the hardest time giving it up for another day, hahahaa! I thought it'd be fun to share a few of these stories with you over the next few posts.

    Today's story comes from England, and is entitled The Missing Five Pound Note. It goes like this:

    Chippenham George worked for the Post Office and his job was to process all the mail that had illegible addresses.  One day just before Christmas, a letter landed on his desk simply addressed in shaky handwriting: 'To God'.  With no other clue on the envelope, George opened the letter and read:

    Dear God,

    I am an 93 year old widow living on the State pension.  Yesterday someone stole my purse.  It had £100 in it, which was all the money I had in the world and no pension due until after Christmas.  Next week is Christmas and I had invited two of my friends over for Christmas lunch.  Without that money, I have nothing to buy food with.  I have no family to turn to, and you are my only hope.  God; can you please help me?

    Chippenham George was really touched, and being kind hearted, he put a copy of the letter up on the staff notice board at the main Fareham sorting office where he worked.  The letter touched the other postmen and they all dug into their pockets and had a whip round.  Between them they raised £95.  [$170 USD] Using an officially franked Post Office envelope, they sent the cash on to the old lady, and for the rest of the day, all the workers felt a warm glow thinking of the nice thing they had done.

    Christmas came and went.  A few days later, another letter simply addressed to 'God' landed in the Sorting Office.  Many of the postmen gathered around while George opened the letter.  It read,

    Dear God,Christmas Stories

    How can I ever thank you enough for what you did for me? Because of your generosity, I was able to provide a lovely luncheon for my friends.  We had a very nice day, and I told my friends of your wonderful gift - in fact we haven't gotten over it and even Father John, our parish priest, is beside himself with joy.  By the way, there was £5 [$10 USD] missing.  I think it must have been those thieving fellows at the Post Office.

    George could not help musing on Oscar Wilde's quote:  'A good deed never goes unpunished'

    Credits:  Bedtime Stories, Photo and story courtesy

  • Christmas Traditions | Poland

    PolandMost, if not all, of the Christmas traditions in other cultures that we've explored over the last couple of weeks are grand celebrations of one kind or another. There are parties, there is singing and dancing, festivals and much merry making for all.  And, of course, in this way they are quite similar to the American way of celebrating Christmas. Lots of preparation and anticipation for both young and old, most definitely!

    Today, however, we take a peek inside of a country that has a bit more of a somber note to it. In Poland, the Christmas holidays are a time to be very peaceful and to avoid the excess of anything. While feasts and parties and boisterous celebrations are going on in other parts of the world, Poland can often be found fasting, giving up their favorite food or beverage, and great effort is spent on remembering the real reason for the season.

    Advent is a very busy time, tho! Lots of time is spent cleaning the house from top to bottom, washing windows and floors and carpets. It's like spring cleaning! Everything must be clean for Christmas Day. This is common also where parties are held, but in Poland, there are no parties. It leaves one to wonder if perhaps the reason for the spic 'n span home is to honor the Christ child himself.

    Polish mealChristmas Eve day is a very important day. Traditionally it's a day of abstaining from meat. If the Christmas tree hasn't been put up yet, it is brought in and decked out with lights, tinsel and glass bulbs. And mistletoe! The Polish LOVE their mistletoe and love even more kissing beneath it! Overall, it's a pretty quiet day...that is until night time.

    Everyone is pretty hungry by now, and in order for their fasts to be broken, someone, anyone, must spot the first star in the night sky. You can bet the kids are out there, tummy's growling! Once the first star has been spotted, a big meal is served and enjoyed by all. A place is often left open at the table, presumably for the Christ child.  The evening ends with attending a midnite mass.

    At dawn on Christmas Day, it's back to church for an early morning mass with special communion, a mass that honors Mary, the mother of Jesus.

    Photo credit:  Flag, Table,

  • Christmas Traditions ~ Madagascar

    summer campSummer camp was a regular thing for me as a kid growing up. The church camp I attended was about 3 1/2 hours from home, and I still remember riding in the back of the station wagon with my feet dangling out the back window, knowing that when we hit the dirt road we'd be almost there. The week ahead would include swimming, horse back riding, box hockey and of course mess hall.

    There were also required services, and I remember many sweltering nights in the tent listening to the speaker. It seemed as though it would never end sometimes, and the heat and humidity made many young bodies restless. All we could think about in those moments was cooling off in the pool! It would last probably a little over an hour, but honestly it felt like 6 times that long.

    church serviceThe people of Madagascar would have felt right at home. Living on an island located off the east coast of Africa, Madagascar people never experience cold or snow at Christmas. Instead, it would be more like my summer camp experience. And since Christmas is far less about gifts exchanged and more about being in church there, nobody would become restless, not even the children. Their typical Christmas service starts at 5pm and goes until well after midnite! I guess we were just a bunch of whiners, haha!

    pointsettiaAnother interesting fact about Madagascar is that pointsettias, a holiday plant here in the U.S., are not these small little indoor plants that only flower at Christmas. Nope. In Madagascar, they are extremely large outdoor shrubs that flower year round! In fact the pointsettia is their national emblem!

    Photo credit:  Camp, Christmas Service, Pointsettia

     

  • Christmas Traditions ~ Boston

    Minn NiceIt is a little known fact that the people are so polite, so nice in Minnesota that they have earned the title,"Minnesota Nice."  Their politeness and willingness to go out of their way for others isn't isolated in practice toward tourists either, even though the more industrious Minnesotans have created tshirts, mugs, key chains, etc. with the slogan on it.

    Minnesota Nice is really just common courtesies in every day life extended  to anyone you might happen to meet without expecting anything in return. While this kind way of living has been lost in many other parts of the U.S., Minnesota has managed to retain it. It really is remarkable.

    But, as it turns out, Minnesota is not the only state in the union that knows a thing or two about this. On December 6th, 1917, a massive explosion rocked the City of Halifax, destroying 1600 homes, killing close to 2000 people and injuring hundreds. Within hours, help came from across the border, a most unlikely place. The people of Boston, upon hearing the devastating news, were on the scene to lend a hand. A relief train with food, water, medical supplies, and workers to distribute them was dispatched, arriving on December 8 only slowed by a massive snow storm.

    boston tree

    Food and water were distributed, and medical workers relieved the Nova Scotia team, many of whom had been on duty since the explosion. Bostonians continued helping throughout the rebuilding process, forming an enduring bond between the two cities that still exists today!

    That year, as a small gesture of their gratitude, Halifax sent a Christmas tree to Boston. Decades later someone decided that once wasn't enough, and so since 1971 Halifax has sent a Christmas tree to Boston every year! Talk about Minnesota nice. And, being neighborly and grateful. This definitely gives Minnesota a run for their money in the nice category!

    I'd love to see other cities trying to outdo the people in Boston, Minnesota and Halifax. That would put a whole new face on Christmas!

    Photo credit:  MN Nice, Christmas Tree

     

  • Christmas Traditions ~ Finland

    christmas loveI've been taking a look over the last couple of weeks at Christmas traditions in other cultures, and I hope you have found it as interesting as I have! I think my favorite ones have been those that, no matter what they do, there is a sense of community. While it is true that numerous countries believe that Christmas is a stay-at-home, private celebration, even those places have gatherings and visit family and friends and participate in community events either in the days preceding Christmas or the days following. It's all about the love!

    The Finns have one of THE best Christmas traditions that I have read so far, tho. Being one of those countries that holds fast to Christmas being a private, family, stay-at-home event, there is something that many Finns do after a light Christmas Eve lunch. They go to the spa! Since the weather is so frigid in Finland, I think we can

    finnland saunasafely assume that these spas are not what we think of in the U.S. More than likely, they are something of a hot house in the backyard. The Finns, perhaps in order to prepare themselves for the busyness of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, decide there is no better way to spend Christmas Eve afternoon that in the sauna. Whatever the reason, the practice is significant enough that a stamp was created in its honor!

    When I was in Vegas a couple of weeks ago, I did something similar. Many of my team members wanted to walk down the strip, see the sights. It was nearly 100 degrees, and since I'm from Minnesota all I could think about was sitting at the edge of the pool! So, I stayed back while the others did the traditional Vegas thing, sunbathed and scheduled a Swedish massage! By the time my work event started that evening, I was rested, relaxed and ready to learn!

    I think sitting in a sauna with the people I am closest to on Christmas Eve afternoon sounds like one of the most relaxing, refreshing ideas I've ever heard.

     

    Photo credit:  Heart, Sauna

  • Christmas Traditions ~ Venezuela

    massIt's been fun discovering the interesting ways that other cultures celebrate Christmas and what traditions they hold to. If you've missed any of the posts in this series, take a look back...some of them will definitely bring a smile to your face. :) We've looked at Ireland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Japan. Today we're moving to the country of Venezuela in South America to see their unique ways.

    Venezuela, like most of the rest of South America, is largely Catholic, and so going to mass on Christmas morning would be very customary. Church goers, and even those who don't attend regularly, would go very early in the morning. Nothing really unique about that. But, what is rather striking is the mode of transportation used to get to mass. The streets are even closed down to vehicles the night before in order to ensure safety. You see, everyone gets to mass on . . . roller skates!

    Rollerskating-Venezuela

    And, that's not all. The night before, children tie a piece of string to their big toes and hang the other end out the window. As the roller skates go by the next morning on their way to mass, they yank on all the strings hanging out the window! You know this would never work in America because children are typically up before anyone on Christmas morning!

    There is still more. On Christmas Eve, instead of the usual caroling from house to house, the people beat drums....and, at the stroke of midnight, people shout "Jesus is born!" Firecrackers set the sky ablaze, too. I like that!

     

    Photo credit:  Church, Skating

  • Christmas Traditions ~ Japan

    coke power of suggestionMy husband is a marketer's dream come true. He sees tacos on the side of a truck on his way to work and comes home hungry for tacos. He sees a tv commerical for chocolate mint ice cream, and he can be found in the frozen food aisle instead of the couch.

    It's true that marketers are paid to conjure up desires and needs, all with the power of suggestion so that the unassuming succumb to their salesmanship. It's a lot more prevalent than we might think, and I know my husband is not alone. I mean, are you thirsty for a soft drink right now? ;)

    In Japan, the power of suggestion has been so successful that it pretty much dictates what people eat for Christmas Eve dinner. It doesn't involve rice or stir fry or any kind of sushi.

    kfc

    Nothing traditionally Japanese, and even though it would never be considered fine dining, a reservation must be made in order to ensure this dish will be on the Christmas Eve table.

    You will be as surprised as I was to know that it's none other than a US fast food, made by the Colonel himself. Yep, the Japanese eat Kentucky Fried Chicken for Christmas Eve dinner.

    That ad campaign in Japan back in 1974 was a smashing success!

     

    Photo credit:  Coke, KFC

  • Christmas Traditions ~ Slovakia

    food fightI raised three boys. Three rambunctious, creative, genius boys that all loved food. Food was the top thing on their minds most of the time, and the time not spent thinking about, playing with or eating it was a whirlwind of little boy action. The played hard, slept hard and ate a lot! I'm sure anyone who has raised little boys can relate.

    We, of course, taught manners at the table, and as is often the case sometimes these manners were better exemplified at someone else's house or in the junior high cafeteria. I once got a phone call from the junior high telling me what a pleasure it was having my two sons in the cafeteria line. As she told me the story, evidently my two little angels were the only ones to say thank you. Juxtapose that against our own dinner table that would rival any college cafeteria when all manner of food was flung up, down and anywhere else it would fly and hopefully stick.

    loksaSo, what does this have to do with Christmas traditions in Slovakia? I'm glad you asked. Apparently a well loved, rather quirky tradition that still lingers today involves the throwing of food! It's true. The legend states that loksa, a mixture of sweetened poppyseed, bread and water, would be served for Christmas Eve.  At the beginning of Christmas Eve dinner, the head of the family would take a spoon of loksa and throw it up at the ceiling.  Apparently, the more mixture that stuck to the ceiling, the better his crops did the following year.

    Actually food throwing is a custom popular in many areas of Slovakia and the Ukraine, and it is a well-loved tradition by everyone (especially little boys?!) . . . except for the women who have to clean it up. Hahahaaaa!!  Why am I not surprised?

     

    Photo credit:  food fight, laksa

  • Christmas Traditions ~ The Czech Republic

    czech mapToday is our second post in our series about Christmas traditions around the world, and I'm going to tell you about some pretty interesting things that the Czech's do. I've been reading up on different customs around the world, and there are some countries whose customs are fairly similar to ours here in the US. However, as we'll see today, some are also very different!

    A friend of mine got to travel to The Czech Republic recently because her husband was going on business. She was ecstatic to tag along, and no doubt had a real cultural shock as so many do when visiting other places in the world. Sometimes we get stuck in our own little world and think that everyone does things just exactly the way we do, but that simply is not true.

    The Czech Republic is one of those places. The Czech people are very superstitious so many of the Christmas customs are also. Mostly revolving around foretelling some aspect of the future or the magical powers of certain foods, Czechs are very serious about it all. It's not a lot different than the people who believe in horoscopes to help them prepare or plan for their future, really.  Or people who go to fortune tellers. But, the Czech Christmas tradition has a bit of a twist on that concept. Of course it has a twist. I like twists. :)

    czech bootsI don't know a single, never-married woman alive who at some point wonders if she will marry and if so, when. We may dream about who he'll be and what our life will be like, too. Well, evidently Christmas is the time in the Czech Republic where single women can discover something about their romantic future. And they do it with a very logical object, really, when you think about it. Especially for women. They use their shoes!

    The custom says that a single woman will take off her shoes, and stand with her back to the door. She then throws one shoe over her shoulder toward the door, and if the shoe lands with the toe pointing toward the door, it's time to go shopping for the wedding dress! But, that is not all.

    elder treeIf she wants to know where her future beau will come from, there is yet another custom for that. It's true. She has to first find an elder tree. (It would behoove any father who wishes his daughters to marry to plant these types of trees in the yard when the girl is born, no?) Once she has found an elder tree, she simply shakes the branches. If, while she is shaking the branches, a dog barks, she will marry a man from the same direction that the bark came from. Lots of things could be said about this, but evidently in the Czech Republic, this brings hope to the young maiden, and perhaps a clue as to where she should be spending more time in the coming hear.

    Photo credit:  Map, Boots, Tree

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